HOUSTON MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE TO HOLD COMMUNITY FORUM TO DISCUSS THE STATE OF LOCAL AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS

December 8, 2016 (Houston, Texas) - The Houston Museum of African American Culture (HMAAC) is holding a community forum Thursday, December 15th, 2016 to continue its comprehensive community engagement initiatives. The forum, entitled “The State of Local African American Cultural Institutions” will focus on current challenges facing such institutions, projects to improve local partnerships and collaborations, and identification of resources to strengthen such organizations.

HMAAC CEO John Guess will be joined by Naomi Carrier of the Texas Center for African American Living History and Michelle Barnes of the Community Artists Collective, with the list expected to grow to include other cultural leaders. “This is a critical time for African American cultural institutions and our community,” according to Guess. Added Barnes, “We must take the initiative to focus attention on our cultural community.” “Together we win,” said Carrier.

HMAAC will use the occasion to release its white paper, A Cultural Plan for Houston’s African American Communities, intended to be the basis for community engagement with private and public funding sources. This event is free and open to the general public.

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ABOUT HOUSTON MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE

The mission of the Houston Museum of African American Culture (HMAAC) is to collect, conserve, explore, interpret, and exhibit the material and intellectual culture of Africans and African Americans in Houston, the state of Texas, the southwest and the African Diaspora for current and future generations. HMAAC explores stories inspired by themes of opportunity, empowerment, creativity, and innovation and cultural interrelationships through the lens of the African American experience.

HOUSTON MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE CELEBRATES COMMUNITY AT DEDICATION OF MURAL

December 1, 2016 (Houston, Texas)- The Houston Museum of African American Culture (HMAAC) is proud to announce the dedication of its newest public art outreach project. A mural displayed on the wall of the Johnson Funeral Home at 5730 Calhoun, entitled ‘These Lives Matter’ was dedicated to the youth of the African American community Tuesday, November 29, 2016. The mural, which faces Griggs Road at Calhoun, has been made possible by a partnership between HMAAC and renowned artist and muralist Reginald Adams.

Artist Reginald Adams sees the mural as an important artistic statement about the value of life. “It brings a human angle to the Black Lives Matter movement by personifying the movement with images of a young girl and boy.” In addition, Adams added, “The mural is a statement of pride and empowerment that depicts our youth in a bold and positive way.”

For HMAAC’s John Guess Jr., the mural represents HMAAC’s dedication to expanding the museum’s impact beyond its museum district location. “This project is a continuing step of museum’s efforts in the community and a continued extension of HMAAC’s increasing transformative presence that has featured sponsorship of music, dance and theater throughout Houston.”

According to Johnson Funeral Home President Walter Johnson, “As a funeral home, we are excited to be able to present this message affirming life to our community, and thankful to the Houston Museum of African American Culture for sponsoring it.”

This mural is the first of a number of planned public art projects planned for the Houston Museum of African American Culture in the coming year.

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ABOUT HOUSTON MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE

The mission of the Houston Museum of African American Culture (HMAAC) is to collect, conserve, explore, interpret, and exhibit the material and intellectual culture of Africans and African Americans in Houston, the state of Texas, the southwest and the African Diaspora for current and future generations. HMAAC explores stories inspired by themes of opportunity, empowerment, creativity, and innovation and cultural interrelationships through the lens of the African American experience.